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Study Tips

Study Tips

Follow the guide below to find out tips on how to improve your study experience. 

Time Management

Time Management

There are 168 hours in a week. To make the most of your time, it is important to manage it wisely. 

Using a schedule or a planner, you can see how you can maximise your time.

Planning your Time

Schedule the following activities in your calendar

  • Working hours
  • Class time
  • Sleep
  • Meal-times 
  • Family commitments

The time blocks leftover is when you are able to complete your assessments.

Having a schedule is better than no schedule at all!

Note taking

Note-taking

It is important to employ effective note-taking techniques when recording your sources.

  1. Notes must be functional - Decide why you are writing the notes. Are you needing evidence to back up an argument? Are you making connections between points and ideas?
  2. Remember to record the details - record where you are taking the notes from. Record the title of the source, the author, the year, and the page number you have retrieved the information. (Note the URL). 
  3. Use abbreviations and shorthand - they should be easily skim read to ascertain the main idea.
  4. Use a method that works for you - You may wish to use programs to organise your notes online such as Padlet, or Wordpad. You may wish to use the templates found to the right of this guide. 

Mnemonics

Acronyms are useful to keep notes and ideas together to remember. Use the first letters of keywords to create acronyms.

Example:

On the factors that led to Hitler's rise to power:

V = Versailles

= Individual personality

E = Economic collapse

W= Weimar

Notetaking Methods

Cornell Notetaking Method

Effective for taking notes during classes, this format allows you to quickly record main ideas, concepts, and themes. 

Mind Maps

Mind maps are effective for recording concepts and ideas and linking them together in a visual format.  Use main points and keywords as your sub-nodes. Use a different colour for each. Connect key dates, equations, and names as secondary sub-nodes Consider using a program such as Padlet. Click the link to create a Padlet here. 

Paraphrasing

When taking notes it is important to capture the key ideas, themes, and concepts. You can do this by paraphrasing, this is where you put someone else's work and words into your own words. 

  1. Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.
  2. Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a notecard.
  3. At the top of the notecard, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.
  4. Check your version with the original to make sure it accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.
  5. Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.*

Becky Findlay 

Studying Apps and Programs

Study Space

Organise your study space to help you stay motivated and focused. 

  • Set up a quiet area, ideally free from distractions such as television
  • Set up a comfortable and ergonomically friendly desk and chair
  • Surround yourself with key items that will relax you. Small plants and lights can create a soothing atmosphere
  • Avoid cluttering your desk
  • Keep stationery items at hand for taking notes
  • Keep hydrated and healthy! Have some healthy snacks and water nearby - this will help so you aren't tempted to go to the kitchen for breaks

Study space image

Resources

Time Management Template

Smart Goal Method

SMART Goals Method

  • Specific - Clearly define what you will achieve
  • Measurable - What will signal that you have achieved it?
  • Achievable - Is the goal possible? 
  • Realistic -  Is this realistic as one goal or does it need to be broken up into smaller tasks. 
  • Time- based - What time frame have you got to complete your goal?

Notetaking Templates

Notetaking Templates

Study Tips

Mnemonics

Use the first letters of keywords to create acronyms.

Example:

On the factors that led to Hitler's rise to power:

V = Versailles

= Individual personality

E = Economic collapse

W= Weimar

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